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Hinsdale Illinois Looking Good For Sales Tax Revenue


Declared by Wikipedia as the “…top 1% wealthiest towns in Illinois,” Hinsdale is looking good with a positive sales tax trend. After a steady decline for 12 months, the village of Hinsdale, Illinois saw “…an upward swing [in sales tax receipts] that has continued for 25 consecutive months.”

Hinsdale is a suburb of Chicago, located across county lines in Cook and DuPage Counties. The village boasts around 20,000 residents. Their “…base sales tax is what is collected by the state from point-of-purchase sales. The village receives 1 percent of that amount.” Total sales tax in Hinsdale is currently 8.25 percent.

The steady improvement in sales tax revenues is attributed to a stronger economy and “…businesses we have now have been doing better,” says Tim Scott, Hinsdale’s director of Economic Development. He is “…very pleased with the trend of increased sales.”

Scott is confident that new businesses will continue to spring up as a result of the positive sales tax revenues over the past two years.

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Sales tax rates, rules, and regulations change frequently. Although we hope you'll find this information helpful, this blog is for informational purposes only and does not provide legal or tax advice.
Avalara Author
Susan McLain
Avalara Author Susan McLain
Susan McLain began her career as a technical writer in technology industries such as satellite networking and medical devices. Her skills encompass technical and marketing writing, usability engineering, verification and validation testing and protocol writing, requirements development, business analysis, technical illustration/graphic design and marketing. She has owned her own business providing service to small to medium sized business and in other positions, she has been in project management, documentation and marketing. She is currently the content specialist for Avalara helping to “make sales tax less taxing.”