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Kansas Considers Income Tax Elimination


Kansas is considering not only reducing the income tax rate but eliminating income tax entirely. However, a number of reviewers feel that might be a risky proposal.

According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP), “Kansans likely would face higher sales and property taxes if the state legislature moves forward with efforts to eliminate the state income tax.”

In a press release last month, Erica Williams, policy analyst and co-author of a CBPP report released recently, said, “If Kansas gets rid of the income tax the state will likely find itself both raising other taxes on middle- and low-income families and making massive cuts to vital services that will badly damage the state’s economy.”

Areas that would be impacted could include education, transportation and public safety.

The report indicates that “[s]ales taxes in … no-income-tax states [are] 21 percent higher per capita and 18 percent higher as a share of personal income than the national average.”

States are challenged lately to either redefine their tax policy, or continue with large cuts or a combination of the two. Two other states, Nebraska and Oklahoma are also considering eliminating their income tax structure and debating what to exchange it for in order to not have to cease providing critical services.

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Avalara Author
Susan McLain
Avalara Author Susan McLain
Susan McLain began her career as a technical writer in technology industries such as satellite networking and medical devices. Her skills encompass technical and marketing writing, usability engineering, verification and validation testing and protocol writing, requirements development, business analysis, technical illustration/graphic design and marketing. She has owned her own business providing service to small to medium sized business and in other positions, she has been in project management, documentation and marketing. She is currently the content specialist for Avalara helping to “make sales tax less taxing.”