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Kansas City Missouri Approves Casino Improvement District


 Missouri Approves Casino Special Tax District

The Kansas City Missouri City Council approved the petition from Ameristar Casinos to create a Community Improvement District (CID) for the casino to impose a sales tax.  Ordinance 120482, creating the new 210 Highway Community Improvement District in Kansas City, Missouri, is effective June 17, 2012.

The sales tax to be imposed is intended for services and improvements to the casino. The improvements and services requested “…are based upon the knowledge of the District Property and the needs of the District at this time and are thus subject to change or revision upon further inquiry.” The annual need is estimated at $195,000.

A five year plan was developed that includes:

  • Ongoing maintenance and security functions
  • Producing and promoting tourism
  • Make, maintain, equip and/or repair facilities
  • Landscaping maintenance

The sales tax cannot exceed one percent (1.0%).

One of the motivators for passing the petition for the District “…was the fact that they have a $400 million competitor over on the Kansas side of the road that has already had a 10 percent impact on their business,” according to Ed Ford, City Councilman.

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Avalara Author
Susan McLain
Avalara Author Susan McLain
Susan McLain began her career as a technical writer in technology industries such as satellite networking and medical devices. Her skills encompass technical and marketing writing, usability engineering, verification and validation testing and protocol writing, requirements development, business analysis, technical illustration/graphic design and marketing. She has owned her own business providing service to small to medium sized business and in other positions, she has been in project management, documentation and marketing. She is currently the content specialist for Avalara helping to “make sales tax less taxing.”