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Kansas Voters Approve Most Local Sales Tax Hikes


The November 6, 2012, election results indicate that overall, Kansas voters are willing to pay more sales tax in order to have amenities such as better roads and city swimming pools. 

The people of Abilene, in Dickinson County, approved a 0.25 percent retailer's sales tax to fund local street improvement.

Voters in Butler County's Augusta readily approved a 1 percent sales tax increase to help fund a new waterline to El Dorado. Residents in Douglass also approved a sales tax increase.

In Lyon County, voters decided to extend an existing sales tax until 2024.

Marysville voters agreed to fund a new city pool with a 0.6 percent sales tax increase.

Voters in the city of Norton in Norton County said yes to the special question, "Shall the city of Norton impose a 0.75 percent citywide sales tax beginning April 1 [2013] to build a city swimming pool and pay for operating costs?"

Oberlin voters decided yes on the special question, "Shall the city of Oberlin impose a 1.5 percent citywide sales tax beginning April 1 [2013] to build a swimming pool?"

In Finney County, voters agreed to a county wide sales tax of 0.25 percent. Revenue generated by the increase will fund roads and other infrastructure.

Voters in Osage City said yes to a 0.5 percent sales tax increase

Voters in Riley County approved a 0.5 percent sales tax increase to fund roads and other infrastructure.

It has been previously reported here that Hutchinson voters agreed to renew their 1.4% sales tax.

However, Graham County voters voiced a resounding "no" to the special question, "Shall a countywide 0.25 percent sales tax be imposed for the purpose of funding economic development?" And in Lyndon, voters said no to a 0.5 percent sales tax for public service.

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Gail Cole
Avalara Author
Gail Cole
Gail Cole
Avalara Author Gail Cole
Gail began researching and writing about sales tax in 2012 and has been fascinated with it ever since. She has a penchant for uncovering unusual tax facts, and endeavors to make complex sales tax laws more digestible for both experts and laypeople.