Avalara Taxrates > Blog > Sales Tax News > Colorado: Tax Relief for Flood Victims - Avalara

Colorado: Tax Relief for Flood Victims


 Colorado: Now is not the time to worry about taxes.

Update, 10.15.13: Several new counties have been added to the list of counties eligible for tax relief: Chaffee, Crowley, Gilpin, Lake, Lincoln, Otero, Park, and Prowers.

Update, 9.26.13: The Colorado Department of Revenue has extended the tax filing deadline for victims of the recent flooding. Affected taxpayers now have until December 2, 2013, to file and pay online. The following counties are currently eligible for tax relief: Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Broomfield, Clear Creek, Denver, El Paso, Fremont, Jefferson, Larimer, Logan, Morgan, Pueblo, Sedgwick, Washington and Weld.

A lot of things come to mind at the mention of Colorado: the Rocky Mountains, fields of powdery snow, clear blue skies, and even the legalization of recreational pot. Flooding rarely makes the list, and yet floods are the first thing to pop to mind now.

The floods that have devastated Boulder and many surrounding communities have taken the everyone by surprise. Recovery will take a long time.

The Colorado Department of Revenue knows this, and has therefore announced a tax filing extension for taxpayers who cannot file and pay taxes on time because of the recent floods. Affected taxpayers have an extra 30 days to file and pay due taxes. The department will assess no penalties or interest on these accounts.

The extension applies to the following taxes: corporate and personal income, excise, fiduciary, partnership, sales and withholding.

We extend our deepest sympathies to victims of the Colorado floods.

Get Free Tax Rate Tables

Colorado State Rates

photo credit: DVIDSHUB via photopin cc


Sales tax rates, rules, and regulations change frequently. Although we hope you'll find this information helpful, this blog is for informational purposes only and does not provide legal or tax advice.
Gail Cole
Avalara Author
Gail Cole
Gail Cole
Avalara Author Gail Cole
Gail began researching and writing about sales tax in 2012 and has been fascinated with it ever since. She has a penchant for uncovering unusual tax facts, and endeavors to make complex sales tax laws more digestible for both experts and laypeople.