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Missouri Sales Tax Rate Changes, October 2013


 Many local rate changes for Missouri, October 2013.

The Department of Revenue has released a healthy list of local sales tax rate changes, effective October 1, 2013.

Barry County will impose a 1/8% county general sales tax. In Barry County, the city of Wheaton will impose a 1.2 % city public mass transportation sales tax.

Boone County will impose a 3/8% county E-911 emergency sales tax, which also applies to sales of domestic utilities. In Boone County, the Conley Road Transportation Development District will increase its district sales tax from 5/8% to 1%. A portion of the city of Columbia is included in the Conley Road Transportation Development District.

Lewis County will impose a 1/4% county law enforcement sales tax. which also applies to sales of domestic utilities and the county's local use tax.

Macon County will impose a 1/4% county capital improvements sales tax, which also applies to the county's local use tax. In Macon County, the city of Macon will extend the 1/2% city storm water/local parks sales tax.

Oregon County will impose a 1/2% county law enforcement sales tax.

Ozark County will impose a 1/2% county general sales tax, which also applies to sales of domestic utilities.

Platte County

  • Platte County will extend the 3/8% county general sales tax, which also applies to the county's local use tax.
  • Park Plaza Transportation Development District (which includes a portion of Kansas City) will increase the existing district sales tax from 1/2% to 1%. The Tremont Square Transportation Development District (which includes a portion of Kansas City) will also increase its existing district sales tax from 1/2% to 1%.

St. Louis County

  • St Louis County will impose a 3/16% county metro parks-arch sales tax.
  • Norwood Court will impose a 1/2% city capital improvements sales tax. Brentwood Boulevard/Clayton Road Community Improvement District (which includes a portion of the city of Richmond Heights) will impose a 1% district sales and use tax.
  • Chesterfield Blue Valley Community Improvement District (which includes a portion of the city of Chesterfield) will impose a 1% district sales and use tax.
  • Daniele Community Improvement District (which includes a portion of the city of Clayton) will impose a 1% district sales and use tax.
  • Brentwood Boulevard/Clayton Road Transportation Development District (which includes a portion of the city of Richmond Heights) will impose a 1% district sales tax.
  • OHM Woodson Terrace Transportation Development District (which includes a portion of the city of Woodson Terrace) will impose a 1% district sales tax.

Bland is imposing a 1/2% city storm water/local parks sales tax.

Browning will impose a 1% city general sales tax, which also applies to the city's local use tax and sales of domestic utilities.

Butler is imposing a 1/2 percent city capital improvements sales tax.

Clarence will impose a 1/4% city storm water/local parks sales tax, which also applies to sales of domestic utilities.

Cottleville is imposing a 1/2% city storm water/local parks sales tax.

Dexter will impose a new 1 7/8% local option use tax, the same rate as the city sales tax.

Fair Grove will extend the 1/2% city capital improvements sales tax.

Forsyth is imposing a 1/4% city fire protection sales tax.

Gordonville will impose a 1/2% city capital improvements sales tax.

Macon is extending the 1/2% city storm water/local parks sales tax.

Macon County is imposing a 1/4% county capital improvements sales tax, which also applies to the county's local use tax.

Marceline is extending the 1/2% city public mass transportation sales tax.

Norwood Court will impose a 1/2% city capital improvements sales tax.

Oakview will impose an additional 1% city sales tax, which also applies to the city's local use tax.

Pleasant Hill will impose a 1/4% city capital improvements sales tax.

Queen City will impose a 1/2% city capital improvements sales tax.

Republic will impose a 1/8% city fire protection sales tax.

St Louis City will impose a 3/16% city metro parks-arch sales tax, which also applies to the city's local use tax. Union Station Community Improvement District (which includes a portion of the city of St. Louis) will impose a 1% district sales and use tax.

Springfield is extending the 1/4% city capital improvements sales tax, which also applies to the city's local use tax. Heers Tower Community Improvement District (which is partially overlapped by the College Station Community Improvement District and fully overlapped by the Downtown Springfield Community Improvement District and the Heers Towner Transportation Development District) will expire the existing 1% district sales tax.

Tipton will impose a 1/4% city fire protection sales tax.

Unionville will impose a 1/2% city storm water/local parks sales tax.

Urich is extending the 1/2% city public mass transportation sales tax.

West Alton will impose a 1% city general sales tax.

Brentwood Boulevard/Clayton Road Community Improvement District will impose a 1% district sales and use tax. Brentwood Boulevard/Clayton Road Transportation Development District is imposing a 1% district sales tax. Both districts include a portion of the city of Richmond Heights and both fully overlap each other.

Patience required

The list goes on and on and on and on, and includes all localities impacted by county changes.

If you do business in Missouri, you would be wise to find a strong cup of coffee and a barrel of patience before settling yourself in for a good, long read.

Or switch to an automated sales tax solution, and stop worrying about rates for customers located in overlapping transportation and community districts, like the Heers Tower Community District described above.

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Gail Cole
Avalara Author
Gail Cole
Gail Cole
Avalara Author Gail Cole
Gail began researching and writing about sales tax in 2012 and has been fascinated with it ever since. She has a penchant for uncovering unusual tax facts, and endeavors to make complex sales tax laws more digestible for both experts and laypeople.