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Arkansas Announces August 2014 Sales Tax Holiday


 The lunchbox is exempt from sales tax during the 2014 Arkansas August sales tax holiday.

If it seems too early for states to prepare for a Back-to-School sales tax holiday, it isn’t. The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration recently released the dates for its annual tax-free weekend. It will begin at 12:01 a.m., Saturday, August 2, 2014, and conclude at 11:59 p.m., Sunday, August 3, 2014.

Some states, such as Alabama, allow localities the choice of participating in a sales tax holiday. In Arkansas, participation in the tax-free period is mandatory.

Tax exempt items include, but are not limited to:

  • Clothing (aprons, earmuffs, formal wear, underwear, etc) costing less than $100 per item;
  • Accessories (briefcases, handbags, jewelry, wallets, etc) costing less than $50 per item;
  • School supplies (binders, book bags, lunch boxes, paper, etc), no price limit;
  • School art supplies (clay, paints, sketch pads, etc), no price limit; and
  • School instructional materials (reference books, textbooks, workbooks, etc), no price limit.

Taxable items include, but are not limited to:

  • Sewing equipment and supplies;
  • Protective equipment such as hard hats and tool belts; and
  • Sport or recreational equipment.

A complete list of taxable and tax exempt items is available on the Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration website, where there are also instructions for retailers.

Do you sell into multiple states? How does your business handle sales tax holidays?

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photo credit: Zellaby via photopin cc


Sales tax rates, rules, and regulations change frequently. Although we hope you'll find this information helpful, this blog is for informational purposes only and does not provide legal or tax advice.
Gail Cole
Avalara Author
Gail Cole
Gail Cole
Avalara Author Gail Cole
Gail began researching and writing about sales tax in 2012 and has been fascinated with it ever since. She has a penchant for uncovering unusual tax facts, and endeavors to make complex sales tax laws more digestible for both experts and laypeople.