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California: November 2014 Election Could Bring Many Sales Tax Rate Changes


 The power to change sales tax rates may be in your hands.

Last updated 11.6.2014: Posting results as they come in.

On November 4, 2014, voters in numerous localities across California will have the opportunity to impact local sales tax rates.

Cities

  • Atascadero: Measure F would increase sales and use tax by 0.5% for twelve years. Approved.
  • Benicia: Measure C would impose a 1% sales and use tax. Approved.
  • Blythe: Measure W would increase sales and use tax by 0.5% for five years. Rejected.
  • Cathedral City: Measure N would impose a 15% tax on sales of medical marijuana. Approved.
  • Clearlake: Measure R would impose a 0.5% special sales and use tax, which would bring the combined sales and use tax rate to 8.25%. Rejected.
  • Coachella: Measure U would impose a 1% sales tax increase, which would change the combined sales tax rate from 8% to 9%. Approved.
  • Concord: Measure Q would renew a 0.5% sales tax for 9 years. Approved.
  • Del Rey Oaks: Measure R would increase sales and use tax by 0.5%. Approved.
  • Desert Hot Springs: Measure JJ would increase sales tax by 1%. Measure II would establish a 10% sales tax on medical marijuana. Measure JJ was rejected; Measure II was approved.
  • Dunsmuir: Measure N would increase by 0.25% sales and use tax. Approved.
  • El Cerrito:  Measure R would renew a 1% sales tax for 12 years. Approved.
  • Eureka: Measure Q would extend the 0.5% general sales tax for five years, beginning July 1, 2016. Approved.
  • Fortuna: Measure V would impose a 1% sales tax. Humbolt County voters will be asked to approve Measure Z, which would impose a half-cent sales tax. If both measures are approved, the rate of sales tax in Fortuna will be 9%. Both measures were rejected.
  • Gilroy: Measure F would impose a half-cent sales tax for 15 years. Rejected.
  • Gonzales: Measure K would increase sales tax by 0.5% for ten years. Approved.
  • Guadalupe: Measure X would impose a 0.25% sales tax increase, which would change the combined sales tax rate from 8% to 8.25%. Approved.
  • Half Moon Bay: Measure O would renew a 0.5% sales tax otherwise set to expire on March 31, 2015. Rejected.
  • Hanford: Measure S would increase sales and use by 1% for twenty years. Rejected.
  • Isleton: Measure D would impose a 0.5% sales and use tax for five years, beginning April 1, 2015. Rejected.
  • King: Measure M would increase sales and use tax by 0.5% for seven years. Approved.
  • Marina: Measure F would extend the 1-cent sales and use tax for another ten years. Approved.
  • Marysville: Measure W would impose a 1% sales and use tax for ten years. Rejected.
  • Monterey: Measure P would impose a special 1% sales and use tax for four years. Approved.
  • Monteray-Salinas Transit District: Measure Q would impose a 1/8-cent special sales tax. Approved.
  • National City: Proposition D would renew the existing 1% sales tax for 20 years. Approved.
  • Oakdale: Measure Y would extend a  0.5% sales tax for an additional five years. Approved.
  • Paradise: Measure C would impose a 0.5% sales tax for 6 years. Approved.
  • Petaluma: Measure Q would increase the sales and use tax by 1%. Rejected.
  • Pinole: Measure S would impose a 0.5% sales and use tax. Approved.
  • Pismo Beach: Measure I would extend a 0.5% sales tax for another 12 years. Approved.
  • Placerville: Measure I would impose a 0.5% sales and use tax for ten years. Approved.
  • Rancho Cordova: Measure H would impose an additional 0.5% sales and use tax. Approved.
  • Red Bluff: Measure D would increase sales and use tax by 0.25% for six years. Approved.
  • Redding: Measure F would impose a 0.25% sales tax. Rejected.
  • Richmond: Measure U would impose a 0.5% sales tax. Approved.
  • Rio Dell: Measure U would impose a 1% sales tax in the city. Approved.
  • Salinas: Measure G would impose a 1% sales and use tax. Approved.
  • Sand City: Measure J would increase sales and use tax by 0.5%, to 1%. Approved.
  • San Leandro: Measure HH would extend the 0.5% sales tax for 30 years. Approved.
  • San Luis Obispo: Measure G would extend a 0.5% sales tax for an additional eight years. Approved.
  • Sausalito: Measure O would impose a 0.5% special sales tax for a period of 10 years. Approved.
  • Soledad: Measure I would extend a 1% sales tax for fifteen years. Approved.
  • Stanton: Measure GG would impose an additional 1% sales tax. Approved.
  • Tehachapi: Measure F would increase sales and use tax by 0.5% for ten years. Rejected.
  • Ukiah: Measure P would indefinitely extend the 0.5% sales tax. Approved.
  • Union City:Measure AA would extend a 0.5% sales tax.Approved.
  • Weed: Measure J would increase sales tax by 0.25%, raising the combined rate to 7.75%. Approved.

Counties

  • Alameda County: Measure BB would renew the 0.5% transportation sales tax that took effect in 2000 and increase that tax by 0.5%, for a total transportation sales tax of 1% (to expire in 2045). Approved.
  • Fresno County: Measure Z would extend the 1/10 sales tax for ten years. Approved.
  • Humbolt County: Measure Z would impose a 0.5% sales tax. See Fortuna, above. Rejected.
  • Lake County: Measure S would impose an additional 0.5% sales tax for 10 years. Rejected.
  • Sonoma County: Measure M would impose an additional 0.125% sales tax for 10 years, to fund library operations and services. Rejected.

In addition, voters in Berkeley and San Francisco will be asked to approve taxes on sugary beverages. The Berkeley soda tax was approved; the San Francisco soda tax was rejected.

More results

Proposed special sales taxes in the following areas were rejected:

  • County of Del Norte (very close as of 11.6.14)
  • Turlock, Stanislaus County
  • Santa Paula, Ventura County
  • Yreka, Siskiyou

California local revenue measure results.

Stay on top of sales tax rate changes in California and other states. Learn how automated sales tax software works.

photo credit: jamelah via photopin cc


Gail Cole
Avalara Author
Gail Cole
Gail Cole
Avalara Author Gail Cole
Gail began researching and writing about sales tax in 2012 and has been fascinated with it ever since. She has a penchant for uncovering unusual tax facts, and endeavors to make complex sales tax laws more digestible for both experts and laypeople.