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Ohio May Establish Sales Tax Holiday for 2015


 Ohio lawmakers step closer to 2015 August sales tax holiday for school supplies and clothing.

Ohio lawmakers are considering a one-year sales tax holiday for clothing and school supplies. If the bill becomes law as currently written, the holiday will run from August 7-9, 2015.

The bill seeks to exempt school supplies costing $20 or less per item, as well as clothing costing $75 or less per item (or pair). Sports and protective equipment would not qualify for the exemption.

The bill made its way through a House committee, where among other changes the Senate-endorsed exemption for computers and tablets costing less than $1,000 was removed. One change that Democrats could not get through was a guarantee “that counties would not lose revenue as a result of the sales tax holiday.” The Columbus Dispatch reports that the holiday would cost local tax jurisdictions an estimated $3.2 million, “plus a $500,000 loss in state local-government funding.”

As often happens at the end of a legislative session, lawmakers have attached other, unrelated items to the sales tax holiday legislation. The current version includes a historic-preservation tax credit for the Columbus Association for the Performing Arts (CAPA).

Is your business prepared for an Ohio sales tax holiday? Automated sales tax software as a service (SaaS) can make it so. Learn more.

photo credit: Avolore via photopin cc


Sales tax rates, rules, and regulations change frequently. Although we hope you'll find this information helpful, this blog is for informational purposes only and does not provide legal or tax advice.
Gail Cole
Avalara Author
Gail Cole
Gail Cole
Avalara Author Gail Cole
Gail began researching and writing about sales tax in 2012 and has been fascinated with it ever since. She has a penchant for uncovering unusual tax facts, and endeavors to make complex sales tax laws more digestible for both experts and laypeople.