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Texas Sales Tax Rate Changes, April 2015


 Sales tax rate changes coming to Texas.

April will bring new local sales and use taxes to Texas, as well as rate increases.

New or increased local taxes

  • San Elizario, in El Paso County, has adopted a 1% city sales and use tax. The new total state and local rate will be 8.25%. The local rate for El Paso County and El Paso County Emergency Services District No. 2 is 0.5%.
  • Bellevue, in Clay County, will have a local rate of 2% and a total rate of 8.24%.
  • Coffee City, in Henderson County, will have a local rate of 1.75% and a total rate of 8%.
  • Ennis, in Ellis County, will have a local rate of 1.75% and a total rate of 8.25%. The Ennis Crime Control and Prevention District will have a local rate of 0.25%.
  • Lake Dallas, in Denton County, will have a local rate of 1.75% and a total rate of 8%.
  • Murchison, in Henderson County, will have a local rate of 2% and a total rate of 8.25%.
  • Progresso, in Hidalgo County, will have a local rate of 2% and a total rate of 8.25%.
  • Taft, in San Patricio County, will have a local rate of 2% and a total rate of 8.25%.

Special purpose district sales and use tax

The following districts will impose local sales and use tax. They are listed with the new local rates.

  • Ennis Crime Control and Prevention District: 0.25%
  • Fate Municipal Development District: 0.5%
  • Kirby Crime Control and Prevention District: 0.25%
  • Wilson County Emergency Services District No. 2: 2%
  • Zapata County Assistance District: 2%

Finally, Lake Dallas, in Denton County, is abolishing the 1.75% sales and use tax for economic and industrial development. The new 1.75% tax, listed above, is for municipal street maintenance and repair.

Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts website.

Find accurate local sales tax rates for all states. Learn more.

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Gail Cole
Avalara Author
Gail Cole
Gail Cole
Avalara Author Gail Cole
Gail began researching and writing about sales tax in 2012 and has been fascinated with it ever since. She has a penchant for uncovering unusual tax facts, and endeavors to make complex sales tax laws more digestible for both experts and laypeople.