Avalara Taxrates > Blog > Sales Tax Rate Changes > Wyoming Sales Tax Rate Changes, April 2015 - Avalara

Wyoming Sales Tax Rate Changes, April 2015


 April brings local sales tax rate changes to Wyoming.

Several local tax rate changes take effect in Wyoming on April 1, 2015.

Sales and use tax

  • Campbell County decreases sales and use tax to 5%.
  • Crook County imposes a 1% special purpose tax for a combined state and local rate of 6%.
  • Johnson County imposes a 1% special purpose option tax for a combined rate of 6%.
  • Washakie County imposes a 1% general purpose option tax for a combined rate of 5%.

Lodging tax

  • Campbell County: the sales, use and lodging rate is 7%.
  • Crook County: the combined lodging and sales tax rate increases to 8%.
  • Greybull: the lodging tax increases to 3%. The combined lodging and sales and use tax rate is 8%.
  • Johnson County has a combined sales, use and lodging tax rate of 8%.
  • Natrona County: the lodging tax rate will increase to 4%. The combined sales, use and lodging tax rate is 9%.
  • Sweetwater County: the lodging tax rate will increase to 3%. The combined sales, use and lodging tax rate is 9%.
  • Washakie County: the combined sales, use and lodging tax rate is 9%.

New tax district

Effective April 1, 2015, the new Grand Targhee Resort District has a 2% resort district and a sales and use tax rate of 8%. The combined sales, use and lodging tax rate is 10%.

The Wyoming Department of Revenue reminds that the “2% Resort District tax is only collected by the vendors physically located within the boundaries of the resort district.” Additional information is available in the March 2015 edition of Taxing Issues.

Find accurate sales tax rates for localities in all states with this free sales tax rate map.

photo credit: Sweet Dreamz Design via photopin cc


Gail Cole
Avalara Author
Gail Cole
Gail Cole
Avalara Author Gail Cole
Gail began researching and writing about sales tax in 2012 and has been fascinated with it ever since. She has a penchant for uncovering unusual tax facts, and endeavors to make complex sales tax laws more digestible for both experts and laypeople.