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Colorado Sales Tax Rate Changes, July 2015


 Historic Georgetown, Colorado.

There are several local sales tax rate changes in Colorado, effective July 1, 2015.

The Colorado Department of Revenue administers the following taxes:

  • Georgetown is increasing sales tax. Effective July 1:
    • The sales tax rate is 4%.
    • The use tax rate for motor vehicles is 3%.
    • There are no exemptions.
  • In Sedgwick County, the sales tax rate is 2% and the 2% use tax applies to motor vehicles and building materials. There is a 3 1/3% service fee, and effective July 1, the county exempts the following:
    • Food for home consumption
    • Machinery and machine tools
    • Occasional sales for charitable organizations
    • Farm equipment
    • Food sold through vending machines
    • Low-emitting vehicles
  • Bachelor Gulch Metropolitan District is increasing sales tax. Effective July 1:
    • The sales tax rate is 4%
    • There is no use tax
    • The service fee is 3.33%
    • The following are exempt:
      • Food for home consumption
      • Machinery and machine tools
      • Gas, electricity, etc. for residential use
      • Occasional sales for charitable organizations
      • Farm equipment
      • Food sold through vending machines
      • Low-emitting vehicles
      • Renewable energy components
      • Beetle wood products
      • School-related sales
      • Biogas production system components
      • Property used in space flight

Finally, beginning July 1, Dacono is changing tax administration and will self-collect taxes. The sales tax rate in Dacono is 3%; use tax on motor vehicles and building materials is 3%; there is a 3 1/3% service fee and there are no exemptions. Additional information.

Find accurate local sales tax rates for all states with this free sales tax rate map. It simplifies sales tax compliance.

Photo credit


Gail Cole
Avalara Author
Gail Cole
Gail Cole
Avalara Author Gail Cole
Gail began researching and writing about sales tax in 2012 and has been fascinated with it ever since. She has a penchant for uncovering unusual tax facts, and endeavors to make complex sales tax laws more digestible for both experts and laypeople.