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Illinois Local Sales Tax Rate Changes, July 2015


 Lots of local sales tax rate changes planned for Illinois, July 2015.

Updated 6.4.2015: The Illinois Department of Revenue has released an updated informational bulletin on rate changes that supersedes the prior bulletin.. The new bulletin adds Adams County to the list.

Earlier this spring, the Illinois Department of Revenue announced that many local tax jurisdictions were proposing sales tax rate changes for July 1, 2015. At the time, the department was unable to confirm the changes or provide the new rates. Now it can do both.

Business Districts

The following business districts will have sales tax rate increases:

  • Belleville – Route 51 North Business District: 8.10% to 9.10%
  • Blue Island – Western Avenue Business Development District: 8.00% to 9.00%
  • Calumet City – Sibley/East Avenue Business District: 9.00% to 10.00%
  • East Dundee – Illinois Route 72/Illinois Route 25 Business District: 9.00% to 9.25%
  • East Dundee – Dundee Gateway Business District: 9.00% to 9.25%

County public safety tax

The following counties are increasing sales tax rates for sales of general merchandise in order to raise revenue for public safety:

  • Adams County: up 0.25%
  • Jefferson County: up 0.25%
  • Knox County: up 0.25%
  • McDonough County: up 0.25% (revenue also funds transportation)

County school facility tax

The following counties are increasing sales tax rates for sales of general merchandise to raise revenue for schools:

  • Calhoun County: up 1%
  • Greene County: up 1%
  • Jefferson County: up 0.25%
  • Jersey County: up 1.00%
  • Jo Daviess County: up 0.50%
  • Morgan County: up 1.00%
  • Perry County: up 1.00%
  • Piatt County: up 1.00%
  • Scott County: up 1.00%
  • White County: up 1.00%
  • Whiteside County: up 1.00%

Home rule municipal sales tax

The following municipalities are home rule (they collect and administer their own taxes) and are increasing local home rule municipal sales taxes:

  • Carbondale (Jackson County): 8.50% to 8.75%
  • Carbondale (Williamson County): 9.50% to 9.75%
  • Glenwood (Cook County): 8.00% to 9.00%
  • Highwood (Lake County): 8.50% to 8.75%
  • La Grange (Cook County): 8.25% to 9.00%

Non-home rule municipal sales tax

Municipal sales taxes in the following municipalities (administered by the Illinois Department of Revenue) are also increasing:

  • Coulterville (Randolph County): 7.25% to 7.75%
  • Crestwood (Cook County): 8.00% to 9.00%
  • Elkville (Jackson County): 6.25% to 7.25%
  • Lyons (Cook County): 8.00% to 9.00%
  • Montgomery (Kendall County): 7.25% to 8.25%
  • Oglesby (LaSalle County): 6.50% to 7.00%
  • Rantoul (Champaign County): 8.75% to 9.00%
  • Toledo (Cumberland County): 6.25% to 6.75%
  • Wadsworth (Lake County): 7.00% to 8.00%
  • Westmont (DuPage County): 7.25% to 7.75%

Mix and match (because it makes tax compliance that much more interesting)

Multiple local taxes in the following jurisdictions are changing:

  • In Carbon Cliff (Rock Island County), the combined sales tax rate will jump from 6.75% to 7.00%. It is computed as follows:
    • Non-home rule tax will decrease from 6.75% to 6.25%.
    • Home-rule tax will increase by 0.75%.
  • In Deland (Piatt County), the combined sales tax rate will jump from 6.25% to 8.25%:
    • Non-home rule tax is increasing by 1.00%
    • Piatt County school tax is increasing by 1.00%
  • In Morrison (Whiteside County), the combined sales tax rate will jump from 6.25% to 8.25%
    • Non-home rule tax is increasing by 1.00%
    • Whiteside County school tax is increasing by 1.00%
  • In Rock Falls (Whiteside County), the combined sales tax rate will jump from 6.75% to 8.25%
    • Non-home rule tax is increasing by 0.50%
    • Whiteside County school tax is increasing by 1.00%

Additional information is available through the Department of Revenue.

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Gail Cole
Avalara Author
Gail Cole
Gail Cole
Avalara Author Gail Cole
Gail began researching and writing about sales tax in 2012 and has been fascinated with it ever since. She has a penchant for uncovering unusual tax facts, and endeavors to make complex sales tax laws more digestible for both experts and laypeople.