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Sales Tax at Connecticut State Parks: Exact Change Requested


 Hammonasset Beach State Park

According to the Connecticut Department of Revenue Services, charges for motor vehicle parking in non-metered seasonal parking lots and hospital parking garages with at least 30 spaces are taxable as of July 1, 2015. Yet in reality, this change is being implemented gradually.

According to the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP), “state sales tax will be added to parking fees at three shoreline parks where those fees are charged” beginning this Saturday, July 18.

DEEP Commissioner Robert Klee says the gradual implementation will ensure a “smooth transition:”

“To ensure a smooth transition as we begin this new procedure, the state is implementing the sales tax gradually, first at three shoreline parks and then with the addition of other state parks in the near future.” 

In the same press release (dated July 16, 2015), DEEP explains, “Passed in the last legislative session, the 6.35% will now be added to parking fees at 25 of Connecticut’s 109 state parks.”

Confused? You are probably not alone.

Ultimately, Connecticut residents will pay $13.83 to park at affected state parks on weekends and $9.57 during weekdays. Nonresidents will pay $23.40 (weekends) and $15.95 (weekdays). Visitors are encouraged to “have exact change if possible at the ticket booths, and to be patient as the staff work to educate visitors about the added sales tax.” Sounds like a stressful start to a beach outing.

This sort of situation perfectly illustrates the wisdom of implementing an automated sales tax solution. Learn more.

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Gail Cole
Avalara Author
Gail Cole
Gail Cole
Avalara Author Gail Cole
Gail began researching and writing about sales tax in 2012 and has been fascinated with it ever since. She has a penchant for uncovering unusual tax facts, and endeavors to make complex sales tax laws more digestible for both experts and laypeople.