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Missouri Sales Tax Rate Changes, January 2016


 Missouri sales tax rate changes take effect January 2016.

Many local sales and use tax rate changes will take effect in Missouri on January 1, 2016.

County rate changes

  • Benton County is extending the ½% county capital improvements sales tax (also applies to sales of domestic utilities and the county’s local use tax).
  • Crawford County is extending the ½% county capital improvements sales tax.
  • Holt County is imposing a ½% county additional sales and use tax.
  • Saline County is expiring the ¼% county capital improvements sales tax (also applies to sales of domestic utilities and the county’s local use tax).

City rate changes

  • Aurora is imposing a ½% city storm water / local parks sales tax (also applies to sales of domestic utilities and the county’s local use tax).
  • Cabool is extending the existing ½% city capital improvements sales tax (also applies to sales of domestic utilities).
  • Cameron is extending the existing 3/8% city capital improvements sales tax (also applies to sales of domestic utilities).
  • Cape Girardeau is extending the existing ½% city public mass transportation sales tax.
  • Carthage is increasing the existing 3/16% city storm water / local parks sales tax to ½%.
  • Chillicothe is imposing a local option use tax of 2¼% (same as sales tax rate).
  • Columbia is extending the existing ¼% capital improvements sales tax.
  • Kirksville is extending the existing ½% city public mass transportation sales and use tax.

Special jurisdictions

  • New Madrid County Ambulance District (includes all of unincorporated New Madrid County and all cities within New Madrid County) is increasing the existing ¼% district sales tax to ½%.
  • 2317 Belt CID (includes a portion of the City of St. Joseph) is imposing a 1% district sales tax.
  • 25 North Central CID (includes a portion of the City of Clayton) is imposing a 1% district sales and use tax.
  • Forsyth Associates CID (includes a portion of the City of St. Louis) is imposing a 1% district sales tax.
  • Kansas Battlefield CID (includes a portion of the City of Springfield) is rescinding the existing ½% district sales and use tax.
  • Liberty Commons CID, Liberty (fully overlaps the Liberty Commons Transportation Development District, Liberty) is imposing a 1% district sales and use tax.
  • Liberty Commons Transportation Development District, Liberty (fully overlapped by the Liberty Commons CID, Liberty) is imposing a 1% district sales tax.
  • SCZ Development District Inc CID (includes a portion of the Hannibal in Marion County) is imposing a 1% district sales tax.
  • Tiffany Landing CID (includes a portion of the Kansas City in Platte County) is imposing a 1% district sales and use tax.
  • West Pearce CID (includes a portion of the Wentzville) is imposing a ½% district sales and use tax.
  • Kansas City, Missouri District 1 Port Improvement District (includes a portion of Kansas City, Jackson County and partially overlaps the Kansas City Downtown Streetcar TDD) is imposing a 1% district sales and use tax.
  • Kansas City, Missouri District 2 Port Improvement District (includes a portion of Kansas City, Jackson County) is imposing a 1% district sales and use tax.
  • Bridgeton NWP TDD (includes a portion of Bridgeton and fully overlaps the Bridgeton NWP CID) is imposing a 1% district sales tax.
  • 1-49 and 275th TDD (includes a portion of unincorporated Cass County) is imposing a 1% district sales tax.
  • Lormill Heights TDD (includes a portion of unincorporated St. Louis County) is imposing a 1% district sales tax.

For additional information, including reporting codes, all affected local tax jurisdictions, and rates for sales, use, food, domestic utilities and the manufacturing exemption, please see the Missouri Department of Revenue, January 2016 Sales/Use Tax Changes. It’s a doozy of a document.

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photo credit: Dalai Lama Open your arms to change, but don't let go of your values via photopin (license)


Gail Cole
Avalara Author
Gail Cole
Gail Cole
Avalara Author Gail Cole
Gail began researching and writing about sales tax in 2012 and has been fascinated with it ever since. She has a penchant for uncovering unusual tax facts, and endeavors to make complex sales tax laws more digestible for both experts and laypeople.