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Illinois Tax Rate Changes, July 2016


 Sales tax rate changes planned for July 1, 2016.

Numerous local tax rate changes are in the planning stages for Illinois. If all goes as planned, they will take effect July 1, 2016.

In order for the other new rates to take effect on July 1, local governments must provide the Illinois Department of Revenue with a certified copy of the ordinance pertaining to the rate change by the dates listed below. The Simplified Municipal Telecommunications tax rate changes are a go for sure.

Business District Tax

Ordinance must be postmarked or filed by April 1, 2016.

  • Altamont Business District
  • Edwardsville Town Centre Business District
  • Farmer City Business District
  • Forest Hills Road Business District in Loves Park
  • Downtown and South City Business District in Mount Carrol
  • Irving Park Road Business District in Roselle
  • West Main Street Business District in Shelbyville
  • Green Mount Business District in Shiloh
  • Downtown Business District 1 in West Dundee
  • Riverbend Business District 1 in Wood River

County School Facilities Tax

Ordinance must be postmarked or filed by May 1, 2016.

  • Brown County
  • Edwards County

Home Rule Municipal Sales Tax

Ordinance must be postmarked or filed by April 1, 2016.

  • Alsip
  • East Dundee
  • Elmhurst
  • Glendale Heights
  • Lake in the Hills
  • Peoria
  • Riverwoods
  • Woodridge

Non-Home Rule Municipal Sales Tax

Ordinance must be postmarked or filed by May 1, 2016.

  • Monroe Center

Simplified Municipal Telecommunications Tax

Listed with combined rates effective July 1, 2016.

  • DePue, 13%
  • Eddyville, 13%
  • Mansfield, 13%
  • Oblong, 11%
  • Ottawa, 12%

Additional information for local governments is available from the Illinois Department of Revenue.

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Gail Cole
Avalara Author
Gail Cole
Gail Cole
Avalara Author Gail Cole
Gail began researching and writing about sales tax in 2012 and has been fascinated with it ever since. She has a penchant for uncovering unusual tax facts, and endeavors to make complex sales tax laws more digestible for both experts and laypeople.