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Sales Tax News Roundup: Georgia, Mississippi, California


This week: Overlapping sales tax boundaries complicate Atlanta school funding, Mississippi retailers prepare for a back-to-school tax holiday, and hundreds of online retailers follow Amazon's lead in canceling their California affiliate programs.

School sales tax could raise 1.9 Billion for Atlanta School Districts

Four metro school districts -- Atlanta, Decatur, DeKalb County and Fulton County -- are linked by overlapping boundaries and state law when it comes to sales taxes to fund school projects. Fulton can't put an education sales tax on the ballot unless Atlanta does. And Atlanta, Decatur or DeKalb can't go to voters alone. Each district has had sales taxes three times since the late 1990s. In November, the districts plan to ask voters to approve their respective fourth, five-year sales tax. —Atlanta Journal Constitution

Mississippi retailers gear up for 2011 sales tax holiday

Announced Thursday by the state Department of Revenue, the sales tax holiday is set to take place this year between 12:01 a.m. Friday, June 29, and midnight on Saturday, July 30. On those days, the state will not charge the 7 percent sales tax on eligible items - notably clothing and shoes -- selling for less than $100. For many shoppers, that means school uniforms or clothes. This is the third year for Mississippi's sales tax holiday. —GulfLive.com

New 'Amazon tax' law hits small firms in wallet

Thousands of small-business owners – not to mention schools and nonprofits – are scrambling to figure out how much revenue they'll lose as hundreds of online retailers cancel their affiliate programs in response to California's new Internet sales tax law.

On June 29, Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill into law requiring online retailers that use affiliate advertising on California-based websites to start collecting sales tax on purchases from California customers.
Article Tab: Amazon and many other online retailers have terminated their affiliate advertising agreements with California-based websites because of a new law that would require the retailers to collect state income tax.
Amazon and many other online retailers have terminated their affiliate advertising agreements with California-based websites because of a new law that would require the retailers to collect state income tax.
A state can require only businesses with some physical presence within its borders (called nexus) to collect sales tax on purchases from Californians. This new law defines these California-based affiliates as the nexus for online retailers. —OC Register


Avalara Author
Steven Dunston
Avalara Author Steven Dunston
Steven Dunston is a marketing technologist with experience as a web developer, SEO specialist and creative director. Steven is director of the Marketing Technology Group at Avalara.