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New Zealand scraps GST import threshold 2019

  • GST
  • 01 May 2018 | Richard Asquith

New Zealand scraps GST import threshold 2019

New Zealand is considering withdrawing its low-value consignment stock threshold for import Goods and Services Tax from 1 October 2019. The proposed measure would help reduce tax evasion, and level the playing field for local retailers. A public consultation has now been launched to consider the effects of the measure.

Currently, goods bought from foreign online marketplaces or e-retarilers are not subject to 15% import GST if below the thresholds of NZ$400. The withdrawal of the relief would oblige foreign e-retailers to register and charge 15% GST. There is a GST sales registration threshold of NZ$60,000 per annum.

Australia is withdrawing its 10% GST import relief on 1 July 2018. The EU plans to do the same in January 2021.

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VP Global Indirect Tax
Richard Asquith
VP Global Indirect Tax Richard Asquith
Richard Asquith is VP Global Indirect Tax at Avalara, helping businesses understand their compliance obligations as they grow globally. He is part of the European leadership team which this year won International Tax Review's Tax Technology Firm of the Year. Richard qualified as an accountant with KPMG in the UK, and went on to work in Hungary, Russia and France with EY.