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Alabama February 2016 Sales Tax Holiday


 It's good to be prepared.

Alabama’s 2016 Severe Weather Preparedness Sales Tax Holiday will run from 12:01 a.m. on Friday, February 26 until midnight on Sunday, February 28. During that time, certain severe weather preparedness supplies will be exempt from state sales and use tax. Local sales and use tax may or may not apply.

In order to participate at the local level, counties and municipalities must adopt a resolution or ordinance to that effect at least 30 days prior to the last full weekend of February and notify the Alabama Department of Revenue of their intent to participate. The department publishes and regularly updates a list of participating counties and municipalities, available here.

Exempt

Portable generators and power cords with a sales price of $1,000 are eligible for the exemption. Other items include the following, when priced at $60 or less (per item):

  • Artificial ice and blue ice
  • Batteries (AAA, AA, C and D cell and 6 and 9 volt)
  • Carbon monoxide detectors and smoke detectors
  • Cellular phone batteries and chargers
  • Duct tape
  • Fire extinguisher
  • First aid kits (self-contained)
  • Food storage (non-electric)
  • Gas or diesel fuel tank or container
  • Ground anchor system
  • Ice packs and reusable ice
  • Plastic sheeting and drop cloths, or other flexible and waterproof sheeting
  • Plywood, window film, or similar window protectant
  • Portable self-powered or battery powered radio, two-way radio, weatherband radio or NOAA weather radio
  • Portable self-powered light source
  • Tarpaulin

Additional information is available on the Alabama Department of Revenue website. Read more about Alabama sales tax holidays.

Sales tax holidays are popular among consumers but can create compliance hassles for retailers. Sales and use tax software can help. Learn how it works.


Gail Cole
Avalara Author
Gail Cole
Gail Cole
Avalara Author Gail Cole
Gail began researching and writing about sales tax in 2012 and has been fascinated with it ever since. She has a penchant for uncovering unusual tax facts, and endeavors to make complex sales tax laws more digestible for both experts and laypeople.