Avalara > Blog > Sales and Use Tax > July Roundup: Sales tax laws you need to know

July Roundup: Sales tax laws you need to know

  • Jul 31, 2020 | Gail Cole

monthly-roundup-sales-tax-laws

While you focus on your business, we stay on top of legislative and policy changes that can affect your sales tax compliance.

Though few state legislatures were in session during July, numerous states did introduce or discuss sales tax policy changes.

 

August sales tax rate changes.

There are always rate changes. Learn more.

 

2020 sales tax changes midyear update: COVID-19 edition.

Retailers experiencing a pandemic-induced spike in online sales may develop new sales tax obligations. Learn more.

 

Coronavirus tax relief.

Some states are letting tax relief expire as others look for new ways to help businesses stay solvent. Learn more.

 

D.C. looks to broaden sales tax.

The Council of the District of Columbia is backpedaling on a plan to tax sales of advertising and personal information. Learn more.

 

Finance professionals examine impact of COVID-19.

Businesses are monitoring the pandemic’s effect on employee health, finances, and supply chain disruptions. Learn more.

 

July ends with sales tax savings.

Sales tax holidays in Mississippi and Tennessee start July 31, 2020. Learn more.

 

Louisiana increases timely filing discount.

Starting August 1, 2020, Louisiana taxpayers have even more incentive to file and pay sales tax on time. Learn more.

 

Nevada looks to increase tax collections with a tax amnesty program.

Taxpayers with outstanding Nevada taxes may soon be able pay what they owe with minimal penalties. Learn more.

 

North Carolina clarifies sales tax policies on marketplace transactions and more.

Like many of us stuck at home because of social-distancing rules, North Carolina is cleaning house (and sales tax policies). Learn more.

 

States figure out how sales tax applies to electric car charging services.

It usually takes time for states to determine how old sales tax laws apply to new products or services. Learn more.

 

States grapple with fate of COVID-19 sales tax relief.

Some states are extending sales tax relief; others have discontinued relief programs. Learn more.

 

States provide sales tax savings during August sales tax holidays.

Tax-free periods in 15 states provide temporary sales tax exemptions for computers, hunting supplies, restaurant food, and more. Learn more.

 

States urge caution during sales tax holidays.

States with sales tax holidays are reminding businesses and consumers to shop online when possible and practice social distancing while in stores. Learn more.

 

Taxing Tomorrow: States reshape nexus laws for remote employees.

With COVID-19 settling in for a long haul, tax officials are reevaluating how nexus applies to businesses with employees working from home in different states. Learn more.

 

Tennessee lowers economic nexus threshold to capture more remote sales tax revenue.

Currently, remote sellers must register to collect and remit Tennessee sales tax if their Tennessee sales exceed $500,000 annually. Come October 1, remote sellers will have to collect Tennessee sales tax once they make more than $100,000 in sales in the state. Learn more.

 

Vendor discounts for filing sales tax on time.

Numerous states reward businesses for filing and remitting sales tax by the due date. Learn more.

 

Vermont reconsiders need for non-collecting seller use tax reporting.

Many remote vendors are collecting and remitting Vermont sales tax under the state’s economic nexus and marketplace facilitator laws. Are reporting requirements for non-collecting vendors still necessary? Learn more.

 

Wyoming lawmaker calls for broader sales tax and a higher rate.

Budget cuts aren’t likely to fill Wyoming’s budget hole. Could a higher state sales tax rate or a tax on groceries do the trick? Learn more.


Sales tax rates, rules, and regulations change frequently. Although we hope you'll find this information helpful, this blog is for informational purposes only and does not provide legal or tax advice.
Avalara Author
Gail Cole
Avalara Author Gail Cole
Gail Cole is a Senior Writer at Avalara. She’s on a mission to uncover unusual tax facts and make complex laws and legislation more digestible for accounting and business professionals.