Avalara MyLodgeTax > Blog > Blog Post > Wyoming passes statewide lodging tax that will apply to short-term rentals

Wyoming passes statewide lodging tax that will apply to short-term rentals

  • Mar 13, 2020 | Jennifer Sokolowsky

Wyoming capitol

A new Wyoming lodging tax bill has been signed by Governor Mark Gordon. The new law applies to short-term rentals and will go into effect on January 1, 2021.

The law levies a 5% tax on all short-term lodging in the state, except for lodging offered at state and county campgrounds, and allows local governments to impose lodging taxes of up to 2%. This means some existing local lodging tax rates will be reduced from a maximum of 4% to a maximum of 2%.

Currently, short-term lodging in Wyoming is subject to state and local sales taxes, local lodging taxes, and resort district taxes in certain areas. The new lodging taxes will be levied in addition to existing sales taxes.

It’s estimated the new taxes will generate approximately $19 million a year by 2023, which will be divided among counties and the Wyoming Office of Tourism.

Short-term rental hosts are already required to register with the Wyoming Department of Revenue for a sales tax license, collect taxes from guests, and file regular tax returns.

Both Airbnb and Vrbo collect state and local short-term rental taxes on behalf of hosts when guests pay for their rentals. Hosts are responsible for any taxes that are not collected for them.

MyLodgeTax can help automate tax compliance for Wyoming hosts, including registration and filing. For more on lodging taxes in Wyoming, see our state Vacation Rental Tax Guide. If you have tax questions related to vacation rental properties, drop us a line and we’ll get back to you with answers.


Lodging tax rates, rules, and regulations change frequently. Although we hope you'll find this information helpful, this blog is for informational purposes only and does not provide legal or tax advice.
Avalara Author
Jennifer Sokolowsky
Avalara Author Jennifer Sokolowsky
Jennifer Sokolowsky writes about tax, legal, and tech topics. She has an extensive international background in journalism and marketing, including work with The Seattle Times, The Prague Post, Avvo, and Marriott.

Learn more about WY lodging tax rules